EENI Global Business School
Agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS)

Syllabus of the Subject: WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS)

  1. Introduction to the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) of the World Trade Organisation (WTO)
  2. In-depth analysis of the SPS Agreement
  3. SPS Information Management System (WTO)
  4. SPS & TBT notification alert system
  5. Sanitary and Phytosanitary measures in the European Union

The objectives of the subject “Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS)” are the following:

  1. To know the concepts of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures in International Trade
  2. To understand the pillars of the WTO Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS)
  3. In-depth analysis of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) to evaluate the implications for an exporting company

Sample - Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS):
Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS)





Tweter Tweet
Tell a Friend:

/ Contact / Whatsapp / Contact by Skype / Contact by Phone / / Print this page /

Return to the previous page Back

Description - Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS):

The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) of the World Trade Organisation establishes how the governments can apply the sanitary and phytosanitary measures (international standards, guidelines and recommendations).

The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures complements the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT).

These sanitary and phytosanitary measures may be related to:

  1. Food safety
  2. Animal health
  3. Preservation of vegetables

The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures allows governments to implement their own standards provided that they are based on internationally recognised scientific principles and that they comply with the three previous points.

The principle of non-discrimination is applied in the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement)

The SPS Agreement also allows the establishment of standards and methods related to the inspection, control and approval of products by the Governments.

Subjects included in the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures:

  1. Basic rights and obligations
  2. Harmonisation
  3. Equivalence
  4. Risk assessment
  5. Determination of the appropriate level of sanitary or phytosanitary protection
  6. Pest- or Disease-Free Areas
  7. Control, inspection and approval procedures
  8. Special and differential treatment
  9. Dispute settlement
  10. Transparency of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Regulations

The Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement) has been in force since 1995

Non-tariff Measures:

  1. Preshipment Inspection (WTO Agreement on Preshipment Inspection)
  2. Anti-dumping Measures and Safeguards (WTO Agreement on Safeguards)
  3. Import Licenses, Tariff-rate Quotas and Prohibitions
  4. WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT)

Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS) Conformity assessment. International Trade

The World Trade Organisation member states: Albania, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Eswatini (Swaziland), European Union, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyz Republic, Laos, Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of the Congo, Russian Federation, Romania, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe

  1. Countries in process of accession to the World Trade Organization: Afghanistan, Algeria, Andorra, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Belarus, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Comoros, Curacao, Ethiopia, Equatorial Guinea, Holy See, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Uzbekistan, Syria, São Tomé and Príncipe, Serbia, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, East Timor, Yemen
  2. Government with observer status: Turkmenistan
  3. Non-member country: North Korea

Customs and the World Trade Organisation



(c) EENI Global Business School (1995-2021)
Due to the COVID Pandemic, EENI has implemented teleworking. Please only contact by email, WhatsApp or through the information request form
We do not use cookies
Back to top of this page