EENI Global Business School
Islamic Economics

Syllabus of the Subject: Islamic Economics. Zakat. Hawala. Waqf Fund

  1. Principles of Islamic Economics
  2. Importance of the Zakat
  3. Islamic Banking
  4. Hawala
  5. Waqf Fund
  6. Islamic Economists
    1. M. Umer Chapra
    2. Kurshid Ahmad
    3. Muhammad Abdul Mannan
  7. Islamic Consumer Behaviour
  8. Halal Certificate
  9. Islamic Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ICCI)
  10. Arab Development Funds
The Subject “Islamic Economicsbelongs to the following Online Higher Education Programs taught by EENI Global Business School:
  1. Course: Islam & Business
  2. Masters: Business in Muslim Countries, International Business, Foreign Trade, Religions & Business
  3. Doctorates: Islamic Business, Ethics, Religion & Business, World Trade

Learning materials in Courses, Masters, Doctorates in International Business in English or Study Master Doctorate Business in Spanish Economía Islámica Study, Master in International Business in French Économie islamique Masters Foreign Trade in Portuguese Islão

Online Arab Student, Master International Business

Why study “Islam, Ethics and Business”?

Sample of the Subject: Islamic Economics (Islamic Development Bank)
Islamic Economics Zakat





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Description of the Subject: Islamic Economics.

The principles of Islamic Economics are based on the Quran, Sharia, Sunnah, and Hadith (Muhammad's examples and words), like any other aspect of Islam (Islamic Civilisation).

Member countries of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation: Afghanistan, Algeria, Chad, Egypt, Guinea, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Pakistan, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sudan, Somalia, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Sierra Leone, Bangladesh, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Uganda, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Comoros, Iraq, Maldives, Djibouti, Benin, Brunei Darussalam, Nigeria, Azerbaijan, Albania, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Mozambique, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Suriname, Togo, Guyana, and Ivory Coast.

As we have seen, the concept of economic system in the West and the Islamic Civilisation is very different, while the first tends to a secularisation of the economy, in the Islamic Countries the religion should play a fundamental role.

Therefore, some scholars speak of an Islamic Economics (since the 60s), which seeks the economic progress, but preserving the morality and the Islamic values, with its characteristics and differentiated in relation to the capitalist economy of the Western Countries or the socialist economy.

Buddhism also developed the concept of a Buddhist Economics.

The central features of Islamic Economics are:

1- Rules of conduct and ethics derived from the Quran and Sunnah

2- Zakat tax as the basis of the Islamic fiscal policy

A good Muslim should pay annually 2.5% of his assets of his net wealth, to benefit the poorest brothers. This act is considered mandatory from a legal standpoint.

For the agricultural products, precious metals, minerals, and livestock, the Zakat vary between 2.5 (1/40) and 20%, depending on the type of goods.

3- Prohibition of interest (Riba).

Ahimsa (Non-Violence) and International Business

Masters and Doctorates in International Business adapted for...

  1. OIC Asian Students: Brunei, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Indonesia, Malaysia Online Students, Master / Doctorate Malaysia, Bangladesh Online Master / Doctorate in Business, Foreign Trade Bangladesh, Iran, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Iran, Maldives, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Maldives, Pakistan, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Pakistan, Kazakhstan Master International Business, Foreign Trade Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan Master Doctorate International Business Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Uzbekistan
  2. Middle East Students: Bahrain Master / Doctorate in Business Bahrain, Kuwait Masters, Doctorates, Foreign Trade, Business Kuwait, Oman, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Oman, Qatar, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Saudi Arabia, Emirates, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Yemen, Jordan Master International Business, Foreign Trade Jordan, Lebanon, Master, Doctorate, International Business, Foreign Trade Lebanon, Palestine, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Palestine, Syria, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Syria, and Iraq, Master Doctorate International Business Iraq.
  3. OIC African Students: Cameroon, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Cameroon, Gambia, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade The Gambia, Egypt, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Egypt, Libya, Sudan, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Sudan, Somalia, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Somalia, Nigeria Doctorates, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Sierra Leone, Uganda, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade Uganda

Ethics Islam

Mohammad Abdul Mannan:
Mohammad Abdul Mannan. Director of the Islamic Bank of Bangladesh, Sharia principles (Master)

Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development

Religions and International Business



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