EENI Global Business School.

Africa: the Next Emerging Continent



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Syllabus of the Subject: Africa- the Next Emerging Continent. Why doing business in Africa?.

Some reasons for doing business in Africa and trust in the African potential:

  1. African Population;
  2. New Role of the African women;
  3. Deep African Socio-economic Transformation;
  4. Emergence of the African Businessperson;
  5. Trade and Regional Integration in Africa;
  6. Need for Infrastructures;
  7. Better Governance in Africa;
  8. Africa and the Global Market.

Africa: the Next Emerging Continent. Why do business in Africa? Deep African Socio-economic transformation

Online Education (Courses, Masters, Doctorate): African Business and Economy

African Student, Doctorate, Master, International Business, Foreign Trade

We Trust in Africa (Affordable Higher Education for Africans) Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, Ghana, Tanzania, Cameroon, Egypt...

Sample:
African Population. In thirty-five years, 25% of the world's population will be African.

1- African Population.

“The future of humanity is ever more African” (UNICEF).

  1. African population:
    1. 2015: 1.1 billion people;
    2. 2030: 1.6 billion people;
    3. 2100: 4 billion people (1 billion in Nigeria);
    4. In thirty-five years, 25% of the world's population will be African.
  2. Demographic dividend;
  3. Emerging middle-class in Africa: 350 million people (34% of the African population). 1,100 million in 2040 (42% of the African population);
  4. Urbanization in Africa: 353 million people. In 2040, the half of Africans will live in a city;
  5. Young African population: 60% (world's largest labour market).

Moreover, we cannot forget that...

Africa is the cradle of humanity.

2- New Role of the African Women

519 million Women: the fundamental pillar of the African economic development.

  1. African Women: 70% of the agriculture labour in Africa;
  2. Produces 90% of all the African food;
  3. H.E. PhD Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma - Former Chairperson of the African Union Commission;
  4. Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf (Former President of Liberia).

3- African Economy: Deep African Socio-economic Transformation.

African economic growth: 5% in the last decade.

  1. The largest African Economy: Nigeria, followed by South Africa, Egypt, Algeria, Angola, Morocco, Sudan, Kenya, Ethiopia, Libya;
  2. Africa has twenty global frontier markets (50% of the total of the World);
  3. The African Frontier Markets are Nigeria, Kenya, Angola, Ghana, Ethiopia, Morocco, Tanzania, Algeria, Ivory Coast, Zambia, and Uganda;
  4. South Africa is a member of the BRICS Countries;
  5. Top African economic sectors: Agriculture (25% of the GDP) and services;
  6. African manufacturing sector: 10% of the African GDP;
  7. Mineral resources;
  8. Commodities prices;
  9. African demand increment;
  10. Boom of e-Commerce. Information and communication technologies: 7% of the African GDP. African mobile revolution (650 million mobile users);
  11. Agenda 2063: “the future we want for Africa” (the African Union).

Nigeria is the first world's frontier market.

4- African Businessman.

Emergence of the African Businessman.

  1. Alhaji Aliko Dangote (the richest men in Africa, Nigeria);
  2. Isabel dos Santos (the richest women in Africa, Angola);
  3. Onsi Sawiris, PhD Mike Adenuga, Mohamed Mansour, Issad Rebrab, Folorunsho Alakija, Othman Benjelloun, Patrice Motsepe, Aziz Akhannouch, Miloud Chaabi, Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma, Tony Elumelu.

5- Intra-African Trade and Regional Integration in Africa.

Towards the African Continental Free-Trade Area.

Intra-African Trade and African Economic Integration.

  1. Low intra-African trade flows (10 - 13%);
  2. Near 80% of the African exports are exported out of Africa;
  3. Action Plan for Boosting Intra-African Trade (objective: 25% of the intra-African trade);
  4. Cost to transport a container from the Port of Durban (ZA) to Lusaka: 8,000 dollars (1,800 dollars from Durban to Japan);
  5. Africa foodstuff imports: 39 billion dollars annually;
  6. Regional Economic Communities (REC): Trade and Market Integration, obstacle reduction to the Intra-African Trade, Sectoral Harmonization Policies, Macroeconomics Policy Convergence, Financial and Monetary Integration;
  7. COMESA-EAC-SADC Tripartite Agreement;
  8. Organization for the Harmonization of Business Law in Africa (OHADA);
  9. African Continental Free-Trade Area (AfCFTA): fifty-four countries, 1 billion people, combined GDP: 1.2 trillion dollars.

6- Infrastructures in Africa.

Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA).

The need for infrastructures in Africa.

  1. Energy. 600 million of African lives without access to electricity;
  2. Transport. 18 billion dollars in annual investment;
  3. African Corridors Development
    1. Asia-Africa Growth Corridor.
  4. Information and Communication Technologies;
  5. Transboundary Water Resources.

7- Governance in Africa.

Better business environment in Africa.

A better governance in Africa.

  1. More democratic governments;
  2. African Peer Review Mechanism;
  3. Peaceful elections;
  4. Less corruption;
  5. Better business environment;
  6. Improvement in the Easy of Doing Business rank of the World Bank (WB). Mauritius is the African Country with the highest rank followed by South Africa, Rwanda, Ghana;
  7. Tax revenues increment;
  8. Fewer African conflicts (“Silencing the Guns” - African Union).

8- Africa and the Global Market.

Africa: 3% of the global trade.

  1. African share of the global manufacturing production: 1.5%;
  2. Emergence of the partnership with the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa);
  3. Trade between China and Africa: 200 billion dollars;
  4. Trade with India: 90 billion dollars;
  5. Key players: The United States, China, India, the BRICS Countries, the Arab countries, South Korea, Japan, Turkey.

EENI African Business Portal.

Economic Area of the African Civilization.

Sample:
Course Master: Business and economic governance in Africa

Sample:
African Continental Free-Trade Area (AfCFTA) 1 billion people, 1.2 trillion dollar

Sample:
Intra-African Trade

Sample:
African Peer review mechanism

Sample:
Forum on China-Africa Cooperation. Sino-African Trade Relations

Sample:
Alhaji Aliko Dangote, Nigerian Muslim Businessman, Richest men in Africa (Master, Nigeria)

Sample:
Isabel dos Santos, Angolan Businesswoman, Richest African Women (Angola)

Sample:
Folorunsho Alakija, Nigerian Businesswoman, Rose of Sharon (fashion group, Master, Nigeria)

Sample:
Mike Adenuga. Nigerian Businessman, Oil (Nigeria, Master, Doctorate)

Sample:
Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) Master

Sample:
Dakar-Lagos Trans-African Corridor (Mauritania, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Togo, Benin, and Nigeria)

Sample:
Index of African Governance (Doctorate Master Course)



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